Well, I did it. I finally crossed homemade croissants off my list.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

They have been on my list of things I have always wanted to make for way too many years. I always think this year at Thanksgiving I will make Croissants or this year for Christmas I will make croissants.

Never happens.

Time pretty much always gets the best of me and Croissants are not something you make if you do not have time. There is no sugar-coating it. Croissants are a labor love. Worth it? Yes, but most definitely a labor of love. Are you going to want to pull your hair out during the process? Probably, but again, still worth it……

At least once during your life time that is! Will I ever make these again? Probably, but only because I am crazy and these croissants were crazy good and I live in a family of bread lovers. So yeah, in another year or so when I have forgotten all the time and patience it took I will do it all again.

Here is the deal, they are actually very straight forward and technically not hard at all. If you make bread you can make these, but you do need time (think like the whole weekend or you know, fourteen hours or so) and patience, which I have neither of. Still kind of amazed I actually made them, but like I said I have been wanting to forever. Ok well, that and I needed some of the dough for a project.

Oh and I should mention, I made not only one batch of croissant, I actually made a total of three. Yeah, three. One for now and two to freeze and save for Thanksgiving and Christmas. I figured if I was making them, I might as well just make a ton. My cousins are coming for Christmas again this year (so excited!!) and I can guarantee we will have Thanksgiving guests too…..

Enter random kids who my brothers find on the hill. It’s just so much fun!

Not.

Anyway, I am stocked with croissants. Over fifty are sitting in my freezer right now. It’s kind of awesome.

Ok enough, let’s get on with it!

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

Gather your ingredients.

Start out pretty simple. Flour, cold milk, hot water, yeast, sugar, salt and lots of butter!

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

Start by activating the yeast. Combine the warm water with the sugar and yeast. Let sit for 10 minutes until foamy. It should smell bread-like.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

In the large bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl) fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the remaining sugar, salt, melted butter, milk and the yeast mixture and mix on medium speed until combined.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

Gradually add the flour 1/2 cup at a time and mix just until the dough comes together in a sticky ball. I ended up using all five cups, but you may need less.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough into a rectangle about 1/2 inch thick. Transfer to a large baking sheet and cover with plastic wrap. Place in the fridge until chilled, about 40 minutes.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

It’s butter time…..

Also, the secret to amazing croissants and also a pain my rear.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

I found it was easiest to place all four sticks of butter together in a gallon size ziplock bag. Then using a rolling-pin, beat the butter on a work surface to flatten it. Continue to gently beat the butter with the rolling-pin and shape the butter into a 6-by-8-inch rectangle. This part was really kind of hard, but just keep working it.

Place the butter back in the fridge and grab the dough (after 40 minutes or so of chilling in the fridge). Now it is time to laminate the dough, which just means fold the dough with the butter to create layers. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough into a 16-by-10-inch rectangle.Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

With a short side facing you, place the butter in the middle of the dough. Fold the ends up like a letter. Fold over the upper half to cover the butter and press the edges together to seal. Then fold over the remaining lower half and press the edges together to seal.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

Turn dough again so the short side is facing you, and use the rolling-pin to press down equally on the dough to help flatten it. Roll dough into a 15 x 10 inch rectangle.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

Then fold the dough like a letter again, with a short side facing you, fold the bottom third up, then fold the top third down. Use your hands to pull the dough into a rectangle shape. You should now have a roughly 11 x 6 inch rectangle. This completes the first turn. Wrap in plastic wrap and place in the fridge to chill for 45 minutes.

Return the chilled dough to the lightly floured work surface with a folded side to your left and repeat the process to make 3 more turns, rolling, folding and chilling the dough each time, for a total of 4 turns. After the final turn, refrigerate the dough for at least 4 hours or overnight (I chilled mine overnight).

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

That photo above would be all three of my batches…..

What was I thinking?

In over my head.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

Now it’s time to form the croissants. Divide the dough in half and place one half in the fridge while working with the other half. Hopefully your dough will look like the photo above, with layers of dough and butter. If not? Pray for the best! Roll out one half of the pastry on a lightly floured work surface into a 9-by-18-inch rectangle. Using a pizza cutter or sharp knife cut the dough in half lengthwise, and then cut the dough into triangles.

Roll out one half of the pastry on a lightly floured work surface into a 9-by-18-inch rectangle. Using a pizza cutter or sharp knife cut the dough in half lengthwise, and then cut the dough into triangles. Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

Cut a small vertical slit right into the middle of the straight end, and using both hands, roll croissant up pushing the sides out to either side. Place on a baking sheet about 2-3 inches apart, cover with a towel and set in a warm place to rise for 1-2 hours. The croissants will not double in size like other yeast doughs do. After one hour position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 425 degrees

Lightly brush the tops of the pastries with the egg mixture. Bake the pastries, 1 sheet at a time, until golden brown, 15-18 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool on the pan. DEVOUR

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

Or, you can also stuff the croissants with fun fillings. I did chocolate, chocolate peanut butter, cinnamon sugar and cinnamon sugar pumpkin.

All so incredibly good.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

And so incredibly flakey.

It’s all those layers of butter.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

Perfect with a smear of thick homemade pumpkin butter (I have never had the Trader Joe’s stuff, but I think homemade is always better) or apple butter or jam or just more butter!

Or even all by themselves fresh from the oven. So good.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

Or with…

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

Some chocolate.

Obviously, that one had to happen. As I said, I also did chocolate peanut butter and cinnamon sugar, but stupidly I only made two of each of those and they were gone the second they came out of the oven.

Killer.

The fourth one was cinnamon sugar pumpkin, the photo below. I think this one was my favorite. Perfect for fall, yes, but I just love these flavors. It was epic.

Yeah, epic.

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos)

Prep Time 1 hour 40 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
resting time 12 hours
Total Time 14 hours
Servings: 32 Croissants
Calories Per Serving: 414 kcal

Nutritional information is only an estimate. The accuracy of the nutritional information for any recipe on this site is not guaranteed.

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Ingredients

  • 4 1/2 teaspoons yeast
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 6 tablespoons warm water
  • 2 teaspoon salt
  • 4 tablespoon butter melted
  • 2 cups cold milk
  • 5 cups flour plus more for working
  • 2 cups cold unsalted butter 4 sticks
  • 1 large egg beaten

Optional Fillings

Instructions

  • In a small bowl or bowl of a stand mixer, dissolve the yeast and a pinch of the sugar in the warm water. Let stand until foamy, about 5 to 10 minutes.
  • To mix the dough by hand, In a large bowl, combine the remaining sugar, the salt, melted butter, milk, the yeast mixture and 1/2 cup of the flour, and mix with a wooden spoon until blended. Gradually add the remaining flour 1/2 cup at a time and mix just until the dough comes together in a sticky ball.
  • To mix the dough by stand mixer, In the large bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the remaining sugar, the salt, melted butter, milk and the yeast mixture and mix on medium speed until combined. Gradually add the flour 1/2 cup at a time and mix just until the dough comes together in a stick ball.
  • On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough into a rectangle about 1/2 inch thick. Transfer to a large baking sheet and cover with plastic wrap. Place in the fridge until chilled, about 40 minutes.
  • While the dough is chilling make the butter package. I found it was easiest to place all four sticks of butter together in a gallon size ziplock bag. Then using a rolling pin, beat the butter on a work surface to flatten it. Continue to gently beat the butter with the rolling pin to shape the butter into a 6-by-8-inch rectangle. This part was really kind of hard, but just keep working it. Once the butter is in the shape of a rectangle place it back in the fridge to stiffen up again. Don't worry if your butter is not in a perfect rectangle. It's still going to work.
  • Now it is time to laminate the dough, which just means fold the dough with the butter to create layers. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough into a 16-by-10-inch rectangle. With a short side facing you, place the butter in the middle of the dough. Fold the ends up like a letter. Fold over the upper half to cover the butter and press the edges together to seal. Then fold over the remaining lower half and press the edges together to seal. Turn dough again so the short side is facing you, and use the rolling pin to press down equally on the dough to help flatten it. Roll dough into a 15 x 10 inch rectangle. Then fold the dough like a letter again, with a short side facing you, fold the bottom third up, then fold the top third down. Use your hands to pull the dough into a rectangle shape. You should now have a roughly 11 x 6 inch rectangle. This completes the first turn. Wrap in plastic wrap and place in the fridge to chill for 45 minutes.
  • Return the chilled dough to the lightly floured work surface with a folded side to your left and repeat the process to make 3 more turns, rolling, folding and chilling the dough each time, for a total of 4 turns. After the final turn, refrigerate the dough for at least 4 hours or overnight (I chilled mine overnight).
  • To form the croissants, cut the dough in half and place one half in the fridge while working with the other half. Roll out one half of the pastry on a lightly floured work surface into a 9-by-18-inch rectangle. Using a pizza cutter or sharp knife cut the dough in half lengthwise, and then cut the dough into triangles. Cut a small vertical slit right into the middle of the straight end, and using both hands, roll croissant up pushing the sides out to either side. Place on a baking sheet about 2-3 inches apart, cover with a towel and set in a warm place to rise for 1-2 hours. The croissants will not double in size like other yeast doughs do. After one hour position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 425 degrees F.
  • Lightly brush the tops of the pastries with the egg mixture. Bake the pastries, 1 sheet at a time, until golden brown, 15-18 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool on the pan. Serve warm or at room temperature. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 1 day. Makes 25-32 croissants.
  • To freeze the croissants before baking, complete the steps through step 8. Once all the croissants have been rolled place them on a baking sheet lined with wax or parchment paper. Cover the baking sheets and freeze for about 2 hours. Remove the pans and place the croissants in a freezer safe bag and seal. Immediately place back in the freezer and freeze for up to 6 months. To bake, allow the croissants to thaw overnight in the fridge and then bake as directed.
  • Optional fillings for the croissants: 
    1-2 teaspoons of pure pumpkin 
    1 -2 teaspoons peanut butter + 1 square of chocolate 
    1 teaspoon cinnamon sugar 
    1-2 teaspoons Nutella
    Roll each triangle up as directed. Brush each top with egg wash and for the pumpkin and cinnamon sugar croissants, sprinkle with more cinnamon sugar. Bake as directed.

Notes

Adapted from [William Sonoma | http://blog.williams-sonoma.com/weekend-project-homemade-croissants/]

Homemade Croissants (with step-by-step photos) | Half Baked Harvest

So worth it.

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Comments

  1. Fantastic. Everything worked out great for me and your pics and instructions were very helpful.
    Thanks for a terrific recipe

    1. Hey Marianne,
      Happy Monday! It’s so great that this recipe was enjoyed, thanks a bunch for giving it a go! xTieghan

    1. Hey Ashley,
      Did you try the recipe? Was there something you needed help with? Let me know, I am happy to help figure out what may have went wrong! xTieghan

  2. I have been wanting to try homemade croissants for so long, and I appreciate how easy you make everything look. Thank you for including so much detail in your writing, but if you ever get a chance or want to revisit an old HBH recipe, I would love to see a video of the turning process! Can’t wait to try this with your almond berry filling!

  3. Oh my God that recipe looks so delicious I can’t wait to try it myself my son got me a KitchenAid mixer last Mother’s Day and it’s the best present I ever got in my life but I haven’t had time to really use it so now I’m at a time in my life where I want to get into all that stuff big stuff for my family friends holidays so thank you for having such fantastic recipes

  4. Thank you for this .. can’t wait to make them .. one small question about freezing … do you shape a proof the croissants before freezing?
    Thanks

    1. Hi Susanna,
      You can shape the croissants before freezing. I hope you love the recipe, please let me know if you have any other questions! xTieghan

  5. They look amazing, definitely going to try these. What kind of yeast did you use, rapid rise, instant?

    1. Hi Lynn,
      I used instant yeast. I hope you love the recipe, please let me know if you have any other questions! xTieghan

  6. I am dying to make these and impress my family! Do you think cold almond milk would work? Thank you!!

  7. Hello! i just completed the recipe. i followed it to a T. i still had chunks of butter in my dough… i rolled out all 4 times. did i mess something up? are there supposed to be no chunks of butter i the dough?

    1. Hey Kristin! The dough should have small chunks of butter speckled throughout. It sounds to me like the dough was perfect! How did the croissants turn out? Please let me know if you have any other questions. I hope you love this recipe! Thank you!! xTieghan

    1. Hi Claudia,
      After all the folding you should not have any butter leftover. I hope you love the recipe, please let me know if you have any other questions! xTieghan

  8. What is step 8? I want to freeze my croissants, but the recipe isn’t numbered, so I dont know when I should freeze them! please help!!

    1. Hi Chanel! Step 8 is just before you form them into croissants! Please let me know if you have any other questions! xTieghan

  9. 3 stars
    Croissants didn’t rise very much after freezing them. Also instructions weren’t clear about whether to roll n flatten once or 3 times between cooling.
    Taste was nice though…

  10. 5 stars
    They came out melt in your mouth perfect – Thank you so much for sharing your gift. First time i ever made croissants.

    1. Hey Jan! Yes, you can halve the recipe. You dont need to make any adjustments. Please let me know if you have any other questions. I hope you love this recipe. Thanks so much!! xTieghan

  11. 1 star
    I’m not sure what went wrong but I just made this recipe and used the total amount of 4 and 1/2 teaspoons of yeast. I thought that seemed like a high number of yeast for the dough and it was since the dough wouldn’t stop rising in the fridge. And it smells super yeasty so next time I will cut down the yeast to just one tablespoon.

    1. You can keep the dough in the fridge for 3-4 days. Please let me know if you have any other questions. I hope you love this recipe. Thanks so much and happy Holidays!! xTieghan ?

    1. You should freeze once you have rolled the rolls into their croissant shapes and place them on a baking sheet. Please let me know if you have any other questions. I hope you love this recipe. Thanks so much and happy Holidays!! xTieghan ?

  12. Just had a quick comment regarding the instructions at the bottom. It says additional sugar but I put in all 1/4 cup of sugar with the yeast. Is this ok?

  13. Hi, this is my first time baking croissants, and for some reason, after adding 5 cups of flour, it was still not formed into a ball. Is it okay to add more until it is? Thank you!

    1. Hi! It is totally fine to add more flour until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl. Please let me know if you have other questions. Hope you love this recipe! Thanks! 🙂

  14. 1 star
    my daughter and I are attempting to follow your step by step instructions thank you for that but i have many
    years of baking and we can’t understand how you got your dough to roll with the butter layering when it is so
    hard from being placed in the refrig…..we have sections of butter and keep trying to roll the dough but it does
    not look like your photos and we can’t understand what we are doing wrong////////help

    1. HI, I am really sorry for the trouble. The butter needs to be cold so that it creates layers in the dough, which makes the flakey croissant layers. It’s hard to know what the issue is without being there. Can you clarify how you are having trouble? From what I understand, it sounds ad though you just need to roll the dough out with a little more strength. Hope I can help!

  15. 5 stars
    I made these today Tieghan! Delicious! They turned out so flaky and buttery, yummy! What a wonderful recipe. Next time I’m trying the chocolate and maybe some marzipan too! Thanks so much! 🙂

  16. 5 stars
    Hi there,
    This is my second time using this recipe for croissants – the first time turned out amazing! I’m not sure what’s different this time, but the dough rose a lot in the fridge as I was chilling it over night after the third fold, probably a little more then doubled in size! Do you have any recommendations for proceeding? Can I just continue rolling out the dough and forming the croissants as usual, or is the dough not usable now?
    Best,
    Kelsey

    1. HI! Just continue rolling, the rolls will be great! Please let me know if you have other questions. Glad you love this recipe! Thanks! 🙂

  17. Hi, there! I just finished making these for the first time this weekend. I’m a very experienced baker, but as I do with any first time recipe, I followed this one precisely. I also tried slightly longer baking times with each subsequent batch; I’d say 16-17 minutes was about right. The directions didn’t say anything about using parchment paper on the baking pans; I tried it with one batch and highly recommend it. The croissants didn’t stick to it (as they did to the pans without the paper — due to the eggwash) and had a beautiful, crispy browned bottom. Next time, I’d like to try a different approach with the butter: shaving it using a cheese grater as I do with biscuit recipes. I found that the solid slab approach was easy enough to do, but didn’t create the uniform distribution throughout the dough (as it chills, it clumps and creates uneven lumps that didn’t fully even out, despite all the rolling and turning). The croissants turn out fairly hollow inside (exactly as pictured); next time, I might try a different recipe and different flours (I’ve seen recipes using bread flour and cake flour) to see if that creates the striated dough layers throughout. Overall: very time consuming but not difficult and tasted great. Thank you!

  18. Hi. I am going to try out this recipe at home before making for a group of people BUT wondering if you’ve had experience baking these in an oven with the wind turned on? The place I would end up baking them is a commercial kitchen that doesn’t have an option for no wind. I would actually be making dough, through step 8, freezing and then baking in wind… Let me know if you have any tips. Thanks!!

    1. I think what she meant is that she has a convection oven not a regular oven ,the fan in the convecction oven is the wind , I prefer a convection oven over a regular oven mysrlf. camille

      1. Got it! I would reduce the oven temp to 325 degreesF. That should be perfect. Let me know if you have questions. Thank you!

  19. Hey! Can I replace the milk with water and the butter with coconut oil? I need to make this for my teacher and she’s vegan! Thanks <3

    1. Hi! I am sorry, I have never tried that, so I would recommend sticking to the recipe if possible. Thanks!

  20. Greetings I asked a question about the above croissants before I joined … I would like to add more layers by folding a few more times ,is that alright ?

    1. Hi! Sure! You can add more layers. Let me know if you have questions. Thank you and I hope you love these!

  21. Question ,would I be able to add more layers of butter then several more beatings with rolling pin and additional roll outs and folds ? to make more layers in the croissants Camille Poe

  22. can i know how many grams is 4 stick? i had make quite a nos. of times, but every time i fail. each time during rolling the butter comes out. what went wrong.

  23. I’ve made this recipie before and loved how the croissants turned out, so delicious! I decided to make them again last week, but my schedule got crazy and now the finished dough has been sitting in my fridge for about a week. Do you think it’s still okay to use, or should I start over?

    1. Hey Kristin!! I think that dough is totally fine! Oh my gosh, do not waste it. i bet it will be delish becasue it has developed flavor!! Let me know if you have questions! 🙂

  24. Love the step by step photos here. Did you all know that the Croissant was actually invented in Romania ? True story, and as a kid i just had to start my day with a salty croissant. Ha!

  25. I actually began the process of making these croissants using another recipe but finished with yours. I live in a hot climate which makes it very difficult to work the dough without the butter melting. However like many who have commented I have wanted to make croissants for years. The dough actually sat in the fridge for a week after the third folding as I ran out of time. Still very sticky when I finally shaped them
    up but I left them in the fridge overnight and baked the the following morning. Fabulous! The layers were perfect and the kitchen smelled wonderful. I’m over this hurdle so I will definitely make these again soon.

    1. Hot temperatures can be a pain when working with croissants! so glad you got them done though!! Thank you for making them Angella!!

  26. Hi there. Wondering what kind of yeast you used – active, rapid rise, etc. I am making these in a few weeks for Thanksgiving and can’t wait – my first attempt at croissants! Thanks for the great instructions.
    Morreen

  27. A few days ago, I made your other recipe for crescent rolls; and they were delicious and flaky. Thank you for that recipe!
    This recipe also looks like it would be delicious, but don’t know if I want all that butter. So, I think I will stick with your other recipe but add a little more sugar.
    Love your site, I’m glad I discovered it. 🙂

  28. well I took a huge leap of faith in ability today, trying to make these layers of goodness. Started this process at 9 am and finally at 3 pm I got a chance to taste my patience. Well the laminating was tedious and frustrating. Some of the butter broke through the layers while I was rolling. I stayed focus to my goal and at 3 pm. I tasted my hard work. They were flakey and my house smells like a cafe in France. ( I have never gone to France, I guess that s how it should smell like) The taste was amazing!!!! I put some nutella in some of them. Love your blog!!!!!!! 5 for 5!!!!

  29. I’ve tried a couple of croissant recipes before and always felt disheartened by the results but your recipe was the first one that turned out so well for me! They were a big hit! I found it easier to pound the butter out with my rolling pin when I went to laminate the dough, it broke it up very easily (and gets out a lot of frustration!)

    In comparing your recipe with my previous attempts, I was wondering why you chose to melt the butter that goes into the dough?

    1. YAY!! This makes me so happy! Thanks so much for making them and letting me know the results!

      As for the butter, I can’t really remember my exact thoughts on this, but I have a feeling I attempted to soften it in the microwave and ended up melting it. ha!! Let me know if you have any other questions, happy to help! 🙂

  30. I’ve read that you have to use butter that is at least 82% fat, which is kinda difficult to find. Did you use any particular butter? I’m wondering if I can get away with normal butter from the grocer store. I think it’s about 80% fat. Thanks!

  31. Absolutely delicious, thank you. Mine were not as fluffy looking at yours but that will make me try it again!!

  32. So just to make sure I am reading this right. After each turn I should put them back in the fridge for 45 mins correct?

  33. These are delicious, and making them is a great activity to do with kids! My 5 and 7 year old love all the rolling and folding. We like to fill a few with jam. Thank you for the great recipe and helpful photos. I’ve shared it with many people.

  34. I just wanted to say that these are FABULOUS! I made these yesterday with my mom, and initially we were skeptical because our dough didn’t look like yours in the photos, but they turned out to be awesome! Thank you so much for the recipe and photos!! 🙂

  35. I made these using your recipe!!!! They came out spectacular 🙂 can’t wait to make them again. It was so rewarding!!! Bought points with my father in law 😉

  36. Hey Tieghan, i tried the croissants today, ohhhh they are sooo… good, my kids n hubby loved them, they are flaky n delicious better than the one’s we get from out. Thank u for such a lovely recipe, will be doing this often!!!!

    1. Hey Lindsay, butter is listed twice because it is use two different times within the recipe. Please let me know if have any more questions and I hope you love these!!

  37. Unlike some danish pastry doughs I like to fold them as many times as I would for croissants, this gives them the same flakiness, of course being a baker this is much easier for me, but just about anybody can make these treats.

  38. I baked your recipe this AM. Oh they are flakey and delicious, even though technically they’re not exactly right. I have a not so cold refrigerator..cold enough for most of my needs..but the butter started out from my frig not real hard and by the time I rolled it a couple times during the 40 minute segments, the butter was showing through the dough in places. My faulty frig…not your recipe! Next time I’m going to put my dough in the freezer for part of each of the 40 minutes segments. And put my butter in the freezer for 10 minutes or so before I start the recipe. I thought I’d say something because someone else might be working with a frig like mine.

  39. Mila July 3, 2014

    Hi All

    I’ve always love Croissant and yesterday I tried this Homemade recipe and it was a success. Thank You so much for sharing it with us.

  40. Hey this is an awsome awsome illustration. I lovvvee croissants and always kept away from making them because I thought they are soo hard. YOU JUST MADE IT so easy. MY fasting month is coming up in a week and I want to make and freeze em so I can have them before keeping the fast. Much love

  41. I made these today for Father’s Day. They were a HUGE hit! Thank you!! Your directions were fantastic – so easy to follow!

  42. I just finished making this recipe! OH MY! I sure hope I can keep myself from them, so that I can share them with my friends. Thank you for posting the pics along with the instructions. I can’t believe I just made croissants 😀

  43. Question about freezing these: the instructions say to complete through step eight prior to freezing; does this include letting them rise one to two hours? Or do you just shape them and freeze them right away, with the defrost time overnight being sufficient for a rise? I’d love to give these a try, so I’d appreciate any help you can give me!

    1. Hey Helen,
      I would shape them, let them rise the full 2 hours and then freeze. To bake them off let them defrost completely and then bake as directed. Let me know if you have any more questions!
      Hope you love these!

  44. How do you get your croissants so airy? I’ve made them twice now, and mine have layers, but not the big, airiness, fluffy stuff yours have. They rise up nicely (except the chocolate ones). What might I be doing wrong?

  45. I just made these ad caught my oven on fire. I don’t know if it’s normal, but when I was doing the “turns” there were big junks if butter that hasn’t been incorporated. When I put them in the oven the butter melted and ran off the side and caught the oven on fire. Is this normal? On the bright side, what cooked tastes delicious!

    1. OH no!! So sorry about the fire. I hope it was just smoke!?? YIKES!

      Yes, butter dripping in normal, but not so much that it creates smoke. There should not really be giant chunks of butter.

      Happy a few of them turned out for you!

  46. Couldn’t you just slice the butter into slices and lay all of the slices down on the dough instead of the whole beating step?

    1. Hey Erin!

      To be honest, I do not know. I feel like it is a recipe you should not mess with, but I do not really sea why it would not work. Maybe the slices will shift too much when rolling the dough? I am just not sure, but you can try! Let me know!

  47. The 50 croissants in your freezer, baked or not? Do you think you could just freeze the dough and then let come up to room temp before cutting and rolling the croissants? Or better to bake them at the time of making and heat them up in the oven later?

    1. Hi Matt, the croissants in my freezer are shaped, but not baked. I would recommend shaping them and then freezing (unbaked) and then baking. This is also including in my instructions.
      Let me know if you have any more questions!

      Thanks!

  48. Woah. Hats off to you. I’m trying to get brave enough to try this. From the looks of it, it’s worth it. How do the French bakers make these all the time?! Thanks for all the detailed pictures and instructions :)!

  49. Awesome job Tieghan, you make it look so easy! 😉 It’s on my list of things to do, when I run out of things to do…hahaha. Someday!

  50. Making croissants is no small task – I did it myself last year! I only wish I would have been smart like you and made a TON! Yours look absolutely flawless!

  51. I’ve always wanted to make croissants too! Yours look amazing! And I love that you stuffed them with the most amazing fillings… All those flaky layers just look so tempting! One day I will try, when I get up the courage!

  52. Beautiful, Tieghan! I’ve made homemade croissants but once in my life and it is a ton of work, but oh-so-worth-it. I might need to make a batch soon just so I can try those pumpkin ones!

  53. Croissants are number one on my baking bucket list. {yah, totally have one of those.} I don’t really know how it started, but since I can remember I always have to have my croissants with warm NUTELLA. Diet breaker.

  54. WOW! These look amazing Tieghan! You make them look so easy too. I think I may have to add them to my bucket list!

  55. Looooove the filling ideas! Croissants are something I will never attempt.:) I bet this post was a lot of work!

    1. Thank you so much, Kathy!!

      The floods are not affecting us, we just have a lot rain. Thanks so much for the concern. I have seen photos of the flooded areas and cannot believe it!! So sad and crazy!

  56. These look killer good!!! I do not have the patience to make these right now, but maybe someday!! 😉 I especially love your filled ones. Perfect-o!! 😉

  57. How do you have enough time to make these AND that incredible buckeye cake? You blow my mind Tieghan. This is no exception. That pumpkin one; on my word, I might have to go to all the work just to have that. So impressed!

  58. Yay! Go you on making those from scratch…I’m not brave enough. Those chocolate filled ones look amazing!

  59. Croissants truly are a labor of love and it looks like you nailed them. Flaky, buttery…everything a great croissant should be.

  60. I’ve once made croissants and it took me the whole weekend. It was worth it, but now I’m just like “next vacation” I’ll make the next batch… The next vacation here in Germany is in November, maybe I can test your recipe then 😀

  61. Epic indeed, Tieghan! Great step-by-step photos and instructions as well! You are a smart cookie…to make a triple batch so you’re covered for Thanksgiving AND Christmas! Everyone will love you over the holidays. 😉 Such a brilliant idea. I’m venturing into gluten free croissant territory soon (read: lots of testing). So, wish me luck! Thanks for sharing, girl! xo

  62. I’m dying over those flaky layers! I can’t believe your freezer is stocked with 50 of these… I call that dangerous! 😉

  63. Wow. I am so making these! They look absolutely GORGEOUS!! and I’m loving all those fun fillings! Great step-by-step photos!

  64. Wow. These are INCREDIBLE.
    But I think I can understand now, why most people buy the Pillsbury kind. Gosh, what a long process! I have great respect for bakers who can go through all the trials and tribulations of croissant making.
    Ohhh my gosh, that pumpkin cinnamon sugar one looks out of this world. <3 I need one. Now.
    pinned! 🙂

  65. My husband and I just got back last night from a few weeks in Europe including a stop in Paris where we ate far too many croissants. I told my husband that when we get home I want to try and make some — perfect timing – thanks!!!

    1. Oh man, I am not sure mine are as great as the ones straight from Pairs, but they will do they trick since we can’t hope on over to paris anytime we want for a Croissant! What an awesome trip!

      Thanks Allyson!

  66. Sigh.

    Oh Tieghan, you make it look so beautifully easy! I have been wanting to try my hand at croissants for years but it just never happens. I have been telling myself lately that when we live in a different house with a kitchen more conducive to croissant-making – THAT’S when I’ll make it happen!

    1. Ha!! You have to give them try at least once. There is nothing like a hot homemade croissant right out of the oven. It’s awesome!

  67. I have never cared for croissants because of the greasiness from so much butter. However, apples, brown sugar, and cinnamon would make these delicious I bet.

  68. They look fantastic!! There’s nothing better than a homemade croissant warm from the oven. I’m dying to give them another go soon, but it’s so hot here now that it just doesn’t seem doable :((( I’ll try your version next time I make them, because the pb + chocolate one are calling my name 😉

  69. Wow they look AMAZING! I have to say I’ve never had a burning desire to make croissants only b/c I’ve heard it’s so hard but you just made it seem do-able. Since you have 50 in your freezer, I could just raid your stash 🙂 Pinned!